Filtering by Category: ikebana

My Ikebana: Heavy Hydrangea

Added on by the ikebana shop.

This arrangement was from a few months ago…when the weather was still warm! I found some lovely hydrangea with robust blooms in purple and green. I purposely chose very flat containers to further draw attention to the flowers.

 

Extra Detail: I left some space between the mouth of the container and the flowers so that the shape of the container may be properly appreciated as well!

I hope you like it. —Miyako

My Ikebana: Tsubo on TV

Added on by the ikebana shop.

In the Season 8 opener of CBC’s hit comedy series “Mr. D”, the main character, Gerry, goes to Tokyo to seek his fortune. Here is a screenshot of a scene set in a Tokyo apartment. Do you see the ikebana?

Screenshot from “Mr. D”, Season 8, Ep 1, aired on Nov 7th, 2018.  Watch the episode  here . (For Canadian audiences only.)

Screenshot from “Mr. D”, Season 8, Ep 1, aired on Nov 7th, 2018.
Watch the episode here. (For Canadian audiences only.)

“Mr. D” is actually shot here in Halifax and the school they use for most of the scenes is located a few blocks from our shop! The set department did a wonderful job of re-creating the inside of a Tokyo apartment here in Halifax. We were honoured to help with this by providing an ikebana arrangement to the set.

Photo courtesy of Barb L. Thank you!

We hope you enjoyed the show….and liked the ikebana!

My Ikebana: Dry Corn

Added on by the ikebana shop.

In ikebana, we like to use seasonal materials to remind us of our connection with nature and to make us aware of the passage of time. In autumn in Nova Scotia brings out pumpkins, squashes and dry corn, used for displays to celebrate the autumn harvest.

In this arrangement, I use some dry corn, which could be found in any market in the fall.

Here is the whole arrangement.

I hope you like it. —Miyako

My Ikebana: Branches and Sunflower

Added on by the ikebana shop.

In Sogetsu's Textbook 5, the theme of "Composing With Branches" (木の構成とその展開) requires a two-step approach. 

First, a free-standing structure of branches only is created. 

Then, plant materials are added to enhance and complete the composition. 

I hope you like it. --Miyako

My Ikebana: Lily on Black and White

Added on by the ikebana shop.

This is a composition using unconventional materials--a piece of black board and a white board with a round hole, which is a part used to secure an air-conditioner's ventilation duct!

Together with a white container, I constructed a black-and-white background with a geometric nuance.

Here is the whole arrangement.

I hope you like it.  --Miyako

My Ikebana: Maple And Mum

Added on by the ikebana shop.

This arrangement uses maple branches just as the leaves are sprouting.  The green spider mums on the edge serves to connect the maple branch and the container.  The gypsophilia keeps the arrangement fluffy and light.

The bottom part of the container is intentionally left empty, showing only the anchored maple branches.  It provides a gentle climbing feeling to the arrangement.

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Here is the whole arrangement.

I hope you like it.  --Miyako

My Ikebana: Rhody and Lily

Added on by the ikebana shop.

Every year, when it's time to prune the rhododendron bushes in Halifax, we are fortunate to have friends who generously allow us to clip away as many branches as we like! (Thank you Sue C.!)

Even the worm-eaten leaves are appreciated in ikebana.

I put together a simple arrangement of rhododendron and lily.  Here is the whole arrangement.

I hope you like it.  --Miyako

My Ikebana: No Kenzan With Wisteria

Added on by the ikebana shop.

In ikebana, water not only serves as a means to sustain the flowers. Water in itself is usually an integral part of the arrangement.  Arrangements using suiban (flat containers) without kenzan allow us to appreciate the beauty and clarity of the water more precisely because it there is no kenzan to distract us!

 

This arrangement uses wisteria branches to create the structure.  Chrysanthemum and eryngium add colour and character.

Here is the whole arrangement.

 

I hope you like it.  --Miyako

My Ikebana: Watering Cans As Container

Added on by the ikebana shop.
 
Green bamboo tubes and simple rustic jars also make the best containers.
— #32 from The Fifty Principles of Sogetsu, Textbook 5
 

Taking inspiration from this principle, I look around the studio to see what can be used as an unlikely container.  And right there in front of me are the watering cans that we use for our ikebana lessons!  They usually play a supporting role in our ikebana; but today, they are the stars!

Here is the arrangement.

 

I hope you like it.  --Miyako